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Katie McMillan Photos adventures and experiences with a camera.

While in Spain, in a little village called Robledillo de Trujillo where Clare's Dad lives there were many photo opportunities. It was such a beautiful place right in the mountains, full of true Spanish people and no tourists - apart from us I guess. The place was full of community and everyone knew one another, and knew everything about each other which meant when we arrived everyone already knew we was the English kids coming to visit. I decided half way through the holiday to photograph the people I met while there, many of them were either from the bars we went to or from the swimming pool as that was about the only things to do there other then exploring.

People of Robledillo de TrujilloPeople of Robledillo de TrujilloPeople of Robledillo de Trujillo People of Robledillo de TrujilloPeople of Robledillo de TrujilloPeople of Robledillo de Trujillo People of Robledillo de Trujillo

These were the lovely kids we met while in the swimming pool, they spoke English really well and were so eager to learn more from us. Each day at the pool we would be playing card games with them and who ever lost had to bomb in the swimming pool, we also met their family and they even invited us round for an evening meal with them which was so kind and generous.

The bar tenders all knew Clare from her previous visit and became friendly with me and Fil as soon as we got there which was very welcoming. I was a little worried they would question why we was in their village but they were so inviting and welcomed us, showing us their ways.

People of Robledillo de TrujilloPeople of Robledillo de Trujillo People of Robledillo de TrujilloPeople of Robledillo de Trujillo

I have not travelled abroad that often, but I was so surprised at how well we could communicate even though we did not know each others language very well. Luckily Clare spoke a lot of Spanish which helped but even though we went to their village they still tried their best to speak English so we could understand which I thought was very kind.

I would recommend if you ever get the chance to go somewhere rural in a foreign country to take up the offer, we did visit Madrid while in Spain but the experience is just so different and really opens your eyes to how people in different countries live.

I hope I can see so many more amazing places in the world and experience other peoples ways of life.

A couple of weeks ago, on another hung over Sunday a few of us headed out to Ilkley to get some fresh country air. I always forget how beautiful Ilkley is. We went to a little pebble beach area where I filmed one of Jimmy Hollands music video which you can watch here, and it is still just as beautiful. Trip to Ilkley

The boys started skimming stones;

Trip to Ilkley

Trip to Ilkley

but me and Sam could not do it. Fil took it upon himself to try and teach us, lets just say I was that bad I missed the water and lets not go any further with that. But Sam was a little better, and at least the stone made the water.

Trip to Ilkley

Trip to Ilkley

Jordan took my camera and grabbed a few (impressive) photos while the sun was setting

Trip to Ilkley

Trip to Ilkley

And of course, I had to capture a portrait of Jordan in front of the sunset as it was too good to miss and I'm far better at portraits then I am landscapes.

Trip to Ilkley

What a cutie, bless him! It was a lovely afternoon and I'm hoping there will be some more adventures in the near future. I have been pretty busy with business work and I also went to visit my best friend down in Shropshire as she is back from being in Madrid all summer - I shall be posting about that too, along with my trip to Madrid when I visited her out there with Fil!

This is a subject many of you will not feel comfortable reading, and for that purpose that is why I started this project. I have suffered with mental illness since I was 15 years old and it has been present in my life with my Mum suffering with it for as long as I can remember. Up until maybe a year ago, I was terrified to tell people and speak about it due to the huge stigma around mental health and people's fear of the unknown. I've been on medication for three years now, and I've had various counselling sessions with a variety of different approaches but personally they did not work for me. I am not discouraging anyone who may be considering getting help as it has worked for many people, it just was not the right direction for me. For me, the light at the end of the tunnel appear when I ended up having a panic attack in a club when I could not find my friends. I then told them about my mental illness, and they were so supportive. Since being able to talk about it, and not have this fear surrounding the fact I suffer with a mental illness, I could admit to myself that something was wrong even though I had been medicating it for years previous. I now still suffer with depression and anxiety but I have learnt to control it and realise when I'm starting to go down that constant downward spiral and climb back up out of it. Two years ago, I would be having great difficulty writing this and I would be in tears if I managed to, whereas now the only difficulty I have is making it sound right as words are not my strong point. I am more of an actions person. Why am I telling you this, you maybe thinking. Well, for my last ever project at University - doing a BA Honours in Photography - I wanted to do something close to my heart that I felt passionate about and to have a good concept (as my tutor always insisted on!); they are not usually my strong point as I do so much commercial work and I also like to concentrate on the technical side, with lighting etc. Mental illness as I said earlier has always been part of my life, along with many others lives, but like the majority of people the stigma around it creates a shadow over it and stops people being able to talk about it. Which to me, I cannot get my head around as statistics say that 1 in 4 people suffer with mental illness. Those numbers are so small, to the point everyone will at least know someone who is suffering - whether they know it or not, so why is this such a scary subject? In my project I wanted to get across the point that many people suffer in silence, as 'Silent Soldiers' battling through every climb out of bed, every step and every day to make it to the next. If you think this sounds pathetic, then I suggest you stop reading as I will be wasting your time. It is not pathetic, and mental illness is serious. If you suffer with mental illness and someone tells you to stop being stupid, please ignore them, you deserve better and more understanding friends. You are not being stupid, never think you are.

The concept behind my project was to portray the positives of mental illness, people's brave faces and the fact these people still smile. When you first see the set of images, you will see a set of portraits that look like a set of 'normal' (what ever that is) happy people, a standard portrait. But once you read the supporting statement, you come to the realisation that they suffer with mental health issues. My point I want to put across I suppose is don't judge a book by its cover. You are not to know if someone suffers with mental illness, and if they chose to tell you they are suffering you should respect that and be honoured that they have put trust in you to spill these fragile facts about their life.

Here are a few photographs from my project:

Silent Soldiers : Charlie Silent Soldiers : Kate Silent Soldiers : Jeremy Silent Soldiers : Jen Silent Soldiers : Daniel Silent Soldiers : Self

Hopefully from these photographs you only see portraits, you may question why they have been taken but the concept behind them will be unclear (apart from the fact I've already told you what my project is about, pretend ha!) and mental illness is probably the last thing you would think of when you look at these photographs, including a self-portrait.  When this project was in my end of year show, there was audio to accompany each subject and you had headphones to listen to them which made the whole viewing experience so personal as though you was getting to know each individual. Unfortunately this effect is lost over a computer screen and text, but I'm still hoping you can connect with each subject, not judge them because of their mental illness and to grasp the concept behind the project to not fear people with this issue and to feel comfortable to talk about it. Of course this is not something that is going to happen over night, but if you feel a little intimidated by any mental health issues just remember that we are people too and it should not be something to fear. If you feel this way I would suggest maybe talking to people about it, sufferers or even just friends as you will probably find out that they either know something, are suffering or are maybe in the same boat of not understanding. Now, I'm not saying there is anything wrong with not understanding. It is very difficult to understand the situation if you have never suffered from any mental illness as it may not seem like a big deal to you as to why one of us is struggling. But you have to remember even your problems to you may seem huge, but they may not seem that way to others. You cannot rate some bodies problems. Yes there maybe wars going on, homeless people and so many bigger world issues  in the world but your problems are important too, along with other people's, no matter how little or niggly they are. (Please note, I am not saying war, homeless people or huge world problems are not important or that they should be dismissed!)

Now to view the project. Here are the pages I created for a zine to accompany my exhibition as unfortunately being the poor student I was I could not afford to print every single photograph (sob!). Each subject has their story next to them for you to read, some more personal than others and some a lot more upsetting. But please take the positive side of this project. What these people have done, to come out to everyone and explain their mental illness is so brave and I have the highest amount of respect for them. If it was not for these people I probably would not be in the better state I am now as this project showed me you can still be brave with this illness, and you can fight it. There is a light at the end of the tunnel and that black cloud that hangs over your head constantly just finally clear. So thanks guys! Even if this project helps one other person realise this and maybe shows people to not fear the unknown about mental illness, then slowly the stigma around it may fade one day.

To view my zine please click here: Silent Soldier Zine 2014

There was also a video created by my University about my project while it was in the making, it has a little explanation by me and a bit of 'behind the scenes. I look absolutely hideous and so fat - I have recently lost weight, so please do not think I look like that anymore as I can't believe I ever did!

[vimeo 100206179 w=500 h=281]

Katie McMillan - BA Hons Photography Leeds City College from lcchephoto on Vimeo.

Recently mental illness has been in the news, due to the passing of the great Robin Williams. Now even I was surprised to find out he suffered with mental illness, at first I thought how could someone so funny and so cheerful suffer with it. This just showed me that even I can sometimes struggle to see that anyone can suffer from it. I hope that mental illness will be brought to the surface and not hidden away. That employers will not discriminate against it, and maybe try to understand and even help. I want people to feel they can talk about it and for people not to be scared or just say 'its all in your head', 'everyone feels like that sometimes' or just a simple 'get over yourself'. Hopefully we can take steps forward, and start to create a completely different vibe around mental illness. I wouldn't say to beat it, as I think no matter what people will suffer from it but if the public have more of an understanding then maybe the 'silent soldiers' do not have to be silent no more and can be supported through their journey to recovery.

For anyone into music, The Cockpit has been the home of many memories for many years. As a teenager I remember saving all my money to attend as many gigs as I possibly could at The Cockpit. I remember meeting friends outside and then queuing for hours before a gig so we could get a good spot at the front of the crowd. Then once I became old enough to drink I spent every Tuesday and Saturday there. I was lucky enough to get the opportunity to work there as a photographer for Slam Dunk from the age of 18, which has opened up many doors for my career and I have formed so many friendships while there.

The Cockpit was a little safe haven for me, I always knew everyone when I was there and I knew I'd be looked after if there was any situations. The Cockpit family brought me out of my shell, given me my confidence and brought some of the best memories I've ever had. It was a 'home' for us, yes it might have been a shit hole a lot of the time, but it was our shit hole. I will miss my vans sticking to the floor at the end of a night, the run down toilets that you avoiding using for as long as you could and the sweat dripping off the ceiling on those hot summer nights (NOT!) ha.

Below are a few photos of The Cockpit completely empty, not many people would have seen it like this. I took  these for a University project:

Cockpit

Cockpit

I was probably at The Cockpit at least a couple of times a week, attending or photographing gigs and club nights. Most of you probably saw me turn up with a cup of tea or hot chocolate (ROCK N ROLL!) as those who know me know I rarely drink. I got to photograph and see some incredible bands at The Cockpit:

The Wonder Years
The Wonder Years, 2012

LetLive
LetLive, 2013

Tonight Alive
Tonight Alive, 2013

Decade
Decade, 2013

We Are The In Crowd
We Are The In Crowd, 2014

One of my favourite shows I've attended at The Cockpit has to be a recent one with an American band called Bad Rabbits, they are such a fun live band and their music just makes you want to dance:

BR

BR

BR

Now, as sad as it is that The Cockpit is closing down, the good news is that Slam Dunk are opening a new venue, housing Slam Dunk and Garage club nights and also introducing a new club night Ignite which is to co-inside with our club night FUEL at Leeds Beckett SU (formerly Leeds Met SU - they've changed their name too!). This is exciting news for the music scene for Leeds, when everyone thought all hope was lost Slam Dunk comes to save the day.

I am looking forward to what is ahead, and I cannot wait to see what the team have planned and that I get to photograph it.

RIP Cockpit, roll on new times.

And of course, here are some embarrassing photos from The Cockpit:

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Blogging what I've captured is something I've wanted to do for a long while, but until now I've never really had the time with juggling university and various jobs. Not only will I be putting my professional work here, I am aiming to post more personal projects and photographs I capture while out on my travels with my friends.

This weekend, after lots of talks with the boys in 'Calls Landing' we headed up to Otley Chevin, a little hungover from the night before after celebrating my university results and saying goodbye to our friend Scotty. We have been discussing and building up ideas for lots of various projects with their music which I'm super excited about after hearing some of their new record.

Here are a quick promo shot and a curby club group shot we did before we headed up:

Calls Landing

Curby Club

On the drive up the sun was setting and it was the perfect evening to head to the Chevin, we obviously had to go to Surprise View. If you have never been, I suggest you get yourself up there as the views are spectacular once you head over to the rocks. I borrowed my friends GoPro as I am considering investing in one but wanted to try it out before I purchased one. Me and Charlie always play about with my cameras so while I was driving he was doing some filming to capture the beautiful sunset and of course a sneaky shot of himself out the car window.

 Charlie out the car

Once we got up there, we got an ice cream and headed up to the rocks to be greeted by the most spectacular view of what looked like the sun setting the sky on fire. The other car was already there so we joined them and I showed them how the GoPro is linked to my phone, which is so impressive.

Cuties

Along with 3/4 of 'Calls Landing', Lucy & JD joined us on our adventure. Once the sun had set to the point that the GoPro could not pick up anything other then a few twinkling lights from the village, we got out my SLR.

Sunset

Beautiful right?! It was such a perfect time to go as all the street lights started turning on as well. Behind us the airport lights were on and the city behind us was twinkling. The band wanted a silhoutte photograph, which looked super cool:

Calls Landing

And then, JD gets out his pop punk jump. Theres always an excuse right?!

JD JUMP

Such a great Sunday evening, full of great friends and great views. There will be so many more of these mini adventures over the next couple of months which is super exciting, and I will be writing about them. I'm so new to this, so please bare with me. I have lots of catching up to do with things I want to write about including Slam Dunk Festival 2014, my holiday to Madrid and some weddings I've photographed over summer. Watch this space.